European Laws Regarding Satellite Television and Satellite Dishes

 

European Laws Regarding Satellite Television and Satellite Dishes

European Law and regulations try to eliminate a number of existing restrictions (and prevent potential ones) on the use of satellite dishes. It states that private individuals should be free to use satellite dishes without undue technical, administrative, urban planning or tax obstacles.

However, it is not as simple as that. The keyword here is “undue”.

For example, regarding planning laws, “concerns of an architectural and town-planning nature, which are often cited in this context, can be met by solutions which make it possible, where necessary and technically feasible, to minimise the visual and aesthetic impact of satellite dishes without impairing quality of reception, under reasonable conditions and at reasonable cost; such solutions can, for example, involve the location of the dish or the type of dish (e.g. a collective dish rather than numerous individual dishes).”

So you are not automatically entitled to a satellite dish if planning restrictions are not granted. They do not have to be granted, but you are required to seek the best solution acceptable to all parties involved.

Further reading from the clauses and attachments and appendices of the directives uncovers this.

“…regarding planning laws, “concerns of an architectural and town-planning nature”, which are often cited in this context, can be met by solutions which make it possible, where necessary and technically feasible, to minimise the visual and aesthetic impact of satellite dishes without impairing quality of reception, under reasonable conditions and at reasonable cost; such solutions can, for example, involve the location of the dish or the type of dish (e.g. a collective dish rather than numerous individual dishes).”

It does not say “forget all planning laws” and “everyone can have a satellite dish”.

“Tax obstacles: The Commission reiterates its opposition to taxes which are specifically targeted at satellite dishes.”

It states that there should be no specific charge to gain permission for satellite dishes, but this does not rule out a general planning permission charge, which many town halls can apply for most alterations / additions to property.

“Administrative obstacles: It is not acceptable to make the installation of a satellite dish subject to systematic prior authorisation or completion of a complex and expensive administrative procedure.”

For this its down to the interpretation. It does not say “no paperwork or permission is required” for satellite dish installations, but no “complex and expensive paperwork”, but then does not give you a definition of “complex and expensive paperwork”.

Reading all the attached documents and articles relating to a directive gives a lot more detail and insight into the European Law on TVand satellite dish planning permissions rather than the generalised directive on its own, which unfortunately many English newspapers and other satellite TV installers in Spain have done.

 

 

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