Javea, Valencia

 

Javea, Valencia, Spain

 

Javea (or Xabia in Valenciano) is a town in the Marina Alta area in the Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.

It lies about 80 km north of Alicante between Denia and Altea, on the Mediterranean coast and can be reached via the N332 coast road or the AP-7 motorway junctions 62 or 63. The area is situated behind a wide bay and is sheltered by two rocky headlands, the Cabo San Antonio and the Cabo San Martin.

A very popular seaside town, the population of Javea live in three different parts of the city: the village of Javea which lies about 3 km land inward, the port of Javea and the area around the beach of Javea. In the summer the population swells from its usual 29,000 to over 100,000.

 

Declared one of the healthiest climates in the world by the World Health Organization, Jávea is protected by the cool harsh winds of the winter from the north by the mountain of Montgó. The temperatures stay pleasant enough even during the summer, averaging 32°c in the warmest month of August which is also one of the most active months in Jávea in terms of tourist activity.

Fast becoming a popular tourist resort, the town of Jávea has developed into a hot property market for retirement villas and land in general. For the most part through, the inland groves of Jávea are undisturbed by the tourist activities, they still produce tons of citrus oranges every year and the sight remains awesome when the branches are laden in season.

Javea has a number of urbanisations which are used for both permanent residents and for holiday makers and holiday rentals. Urbanisations in Javea include Montgo Urbanisation, Tosalet Urbanisation, Toscal Urbanisation, Balcon al Mar Urbanisation, Rafelet Urbanisation, Costa Nova Urbanisation, Portisol Urbanisation, and Cap de la Nou Urbanisation.

The 2,150 hectares of Montgó National Park add another mix of history and modern lifestyle to the area. The Montgo Natural Park is also a spectacular sight to see, especially Elephant Mountain from which you can take experience another one of the area’s beautiful views. The park is also home to many beautiful flowers, vegetation and rare birds.

Montgo, Javea

The Cabo de Nao San Martin is a small hill with a lighthouse which can be reached by either car or by a path near the harbour area. There are also quite a few old churches in the area which are also popular attractions. The Inglesia de San Bartolome, for example, was built in the twelfth century originally erected to defend against pirates.

The main beach of Javea is Playa de Arenal, a fine sandy beach with a good range of facilities. The beach is backed by a wide promenade which is lined with shops, bars and restaurants, and is also the location for a lively craft market which is held on warm summer evenings.

Javea holds its weekly market on Thursdays and this is a popular place to stock up on fresh locally grown produce.

Javea, of course has its share of fiestas and festivals, the main ones being the Moros y Cristianos (Moors and Christians) in July, the Fogueres de San Juan (bonfire festival) in June and the Nuestro Señora de Loreto (with bull-running) in September.

 

Please click here for more tourist information, weather forecasts and maps for Javea.

 

 

UK TV in Javea – how to receive UK TV, Freesat TV and Sky TV in Javea

Sky TV in JaveaFreesat TV in Javea

The Sat and PC Guy installs and maintains Digital Satellite Television Systems, for reception of UK TV, Freesat TV, Sky TV and IPTV in Javea.

Reception of satellite TV channels from the BBC an ITV can be achieved using a minimum of a 110x120cm satellite dish or the recommended 125x135cm satellite dish.

We install Digital Terrestrial Television, TDT, Spain Freeview for Spanish TV reception in Javea. Depending on your location to the TDT transmitters, you can receive around 30 digital television channels, with the option change the language on many programmes into English.

The Sat and PC Guy – for all your TV Satellite Solutions in Javea.
The Sat and PC Guy – for Sky TV and Free SatPlus TV in Javea.

 

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