Sep 292013
 

Mission Profile:
The Proton M launch vehicle, utilizing a 5-burn Breeze M mission design, will lift off from Pad 39 at Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, with the ASTRA 2E satellite on board. The first three stages of the Proton will use a standard ascent profile to place the orbital unit (Breeze M Upper Stage and the ASTRA 2E satellite) into a sub-orbital trajectory. From this point in the mission, the Breeze M will perform planned mission manoeuvres to advance the orbital unit first to a circular parking orbit, then to an intermediate orbit, followed by a transfer orbit, and finally to a geosynchronous transfer orbit. Separation of the ASTRA 2E satellite is scheduled to occur approximately 9 hours, 12 minutes after liftoff.
Target Orbit at Separation:
Perigee: 4,202 km
Apogee: 35,736 km
Inclination: 23.0 degrees
Spacecraft Separation:
Approximately 9 hours, 12 minutes after liftoff
ILS Mission Statistics:
_5th ILS Proton Launch in 2013
_82nd ILS Proton Launch Overall
_23rd SES Satellite Launched on ILS Proton
_17th Astrium Satellite Launched on Proton

You can watch the launch of Astra 2E live Astra 19 East, frequency 11.023MHz SR 22000, FEC 5/6, and will begin half an hour before the satellite launch.

Sep 262013
 

Astra 2E News Update: 26/09/13 : Astra 2E satellite, the new UK TV satellite, and its launch vehicle, the Proton M rocket, have been rolled out onto Pad 39, in preparation for its launch on Sunday night. (see video below)

“Proton-M” rocket with the upper stage “Breeze-M” and the “Astra-2E” UK TV satellite moved to launch platform “Pad 39”

This is in preparation for the launch on the evening of Sunday 29th (Eurotime) and 30th Sept (Baikonur Cosmodrome time).

Launch time: 2138 GMT Sunday / 22.38 UK and 23.36 Central Europe

The launch will also be shown live on Astra 19 East, frequency 11.023MHz SR 22000, FEC 5/6, and will begin half an hour before the satellite launch.

More Astra 2E news and updates at : http://www.satandpcguy.com/Site/astra_2e_satellite_reception_testing_news_updates.php

Aug 032013
 

Below is an update on the 2 July 2013 Russian Federal Proton M/Block DM-03 GLONASS mission failure.

Russian Investigation and FROB Status
The Russian State Commission has completed its review of the Roscosmos Commission findings. A translated summary of the findings is expected to be provided to ILS on Saturday, August 3. The summary includes information pertaining to the improper installation of the three yaw angular rate sensors located on the Proton launch vehicle and details that the premature Loss of Contact (LOC) of the electrical/pneumatic launch pad interface was not a contributing factor to the failure.
An official ILS/KhSC public release of the Russian State Commission findings based on the summary information provided will follow, along with a schedule for the upcoming Failure Review Oversight Board (FRO.

Based on the progress to date, it is expected that the Failure Review Oversight Board (FRO will begin on August 9 and will tentatively conclude by August 16.

Astra 2E Campaign Status, Return to Flight and Proton Manifest
The Astra 2E team will resume campaign operations after the Russian State Commission and ILS FROB complete the required work on root cause and required corrective actions and all parties agree to re-start the campaign.

The schedule for the return to flight and subsequent missions will be determined once the Russian State Commission and ILS FROB complete their efforts and the required corrective actions have been implemented. A public release will be issued at that time.

 

This is a result of the rocket failure early in July, which delayed the launch of the new UK TV satellite Astra 2E ( http://www.satandpcguy.com/blog/2013/07/astra-2e-could-the-launch-be-delayed-after-rocket-launch-failure-at-baikonur/ )

More Astra 2E launch news: http://www.satandpcguy.com/Site/astra_2e_satellite_reception_testing_news_updates.php

Jul 102013
 

Astra 2E News Update: 10/7/13 : On their webpage SES have updated Astra 2Es launch date…

to….

“TBD”

To Be Determined – and thus confirming a delay in the launch.

The delay in the launch is down to the recent failure of another rocket at the launch site : http://satandpcguy.com/blog/2013/07/astra-2e-could-the-launch-be-delayed-after-rocket-launch-failure-at-baikonur/

Investigators have determined the problem was caused by the “critical angular velocity sensors, DUS, installed upside down.”!!!